Kingsport-Bristol Dec. jobless rate down, so are the number of people working


KB non-farm

Data source Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The Kingsport-Bristol labor market wrapped up 2013 with a mixed report.

–        Employers cut 200 jobs in the four-county area in December and the unemployment rate dropped to 6.4%. At the same time there were 1,210 fewer people who had jobs than there were in November.

When December totals are compared to December 2012, the Bureau of Labor Statistics unadjusted tally shows the area had 800 more nonfarm job. And the Census Bureau Survey of workers shows there were 2,449 fewer people who had jobs.  It’s important to note that the BLS numbers come from a survey of employers about jobs in the MSA while the Census survey focuses on who had jobs – not where the jobs were located. Commuting patters in and out of the MSA are the reasons the Census employed numbers don’t match the BLS job counts.

Put the number of local job aside for a moment an look only at MSAs labor force. That’s the number of people with jobs and those who are looking for jobs.

That number has been contracting. It began a steep decline late in 2011 continue trending higher  after it bottomed in all but one market area in Q3. However, trending higher doesn’t mean it has reached positive ground. The three metrics charted here show improves on the MSA, Bristol and Kingsport urban areas through Q3. In Q4 it dipped again on the MSA level in Q4. Analysis of the urban areas’ Q4 performance by Dr. Steb Hipple will shed additional context when his analysis is released.

EmployedPP

Data source for the employment and labor force charts are Dr. Steb Hipple’s Tri-Cities’ labor market analysis and the Census Bureau/Bureau of Labor Statistics employment reports. The quarterly employment reports focus on the number of people with jobs and those looking jobs and not where the jobs are located.

–        Employment in the MSA also dipped in Q4 when compared to Q4 2012. It has been negative on that measure for seven quarters. The Q4 urban area analysis has not been completed yet.

Now let’s switch back to the actual number of Kingsport-Bristol jobs.

–        Unadjusted preliminary data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows there were 121,800 nonfarm jobs in the MSA in December, up 800 from the monthly 2012 total.

–        The preliminary annual nonfarm average is 120,100, up 900 from the 2012 average and 3,000 jobs less than the 2008 pre-recession annual average.

–        Jobs growth in the service sector was stronger than the goods producing sector during the last four months of 2013.

–        The preliminary unadjusted 2013 annual average shows the service sector added 800 jobs when compared to the 2012 annual average.

–        The preliminary unadjusted 2013 annual averages show the good producing sector added 100 jobs when compared to 2012.

Here’s how the MSA’s job sectors ranked by rounded job totals in the Bureau of Labor Statistic’s unadjusted preliminary report.

–        Manufacturing – 22,000.

LF qtrsPP

Data source for the employment and labor force charts are Dr. Steb Hipple’s Tri-Cities’ labor market analysis and the Census Bureau/Bureau of Labor Statistics employment reports. The quarterly employment reports focus on the number of people with jobs and those looking jobs and not where the jobs are located.

–        Education and health services – 19,400.

–        Government – 16,800.

–        Retail trade – 15,600.

–        Leisure and hospitality – 12,100.

–        Business and professional services – 9,900.

–        Mining, logging and construction – 7,200.

–        Wholesale trade – 4,700.

–        Transportation and utilities – 4,600.

–        Other services – 4,500.

–        Financial activities – 3,800.

–        Information – 1,200.

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  1. […] Kingsport-Bristol Dec. jobless rate down, so are the number of people workingJohnson City MSA employers cut 100 jobs in December, 769 fewer people working  […]

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